National Poison Prevention Week action plan

 

Toddler holding a button battery

Cropped image. US CPSC, Flickr. CC license.

March 20 – 26, 2016 is National Poison Prevention Week. We have you covered with an action plan to make sure you and your family remain safe from some of the most common household poisoning causes.

  1. Plug in the phone number for the national poison control center into your cell phone and the phone of all caretakers of your children: 800-222-1222. Poison control has trained medical professionals available to answer questions 24/7/365 at no charge. If you have any concerns about a potential poisoning, they can help you determine what to do next.
  2. Do a home sweep to make sure all cleaning products are not only locked up safely, but are stored in their original containers. Young children may find that the bright colors of cleaning liquids resemble juices and sports drinks, and take a deadly drink. Be especially cautious if you purchase laundry pods, which are colorful and shiny with a close resemblance to candy. You can find more on laundry pods here.
  3. Visit the medicine cabinet to ensure all medications and vitamins are locked up and out of the reach of children. Now is a great time to get rid of expired or unnecessary medications. The Food and Drug administration offers some great tips on how to properly dispose of these. Also, April 30, 2016 is this year’s National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day sponsored by the Drug Enforcement Administration. Find more information here about your local resources.
  4. Carbon monoxide poisoning is often referred to as the “silent killer”, but it’s easy to keep you and your family safe by ensuring you have working carbon monoxide detectors on every floor of your home. Read for more details.
  5. A poison risk that you may not think about is button batteries, something you may not even realize is in your home. Most of these round buttons come already supplied in common items such as key fobs, remote controls, glucose monitors, fitness trackers, and even books and musical cards. It is important to seek immediate medical attention; button batteries continue to burn the tissue even after it is removed. This article talks more about button batteries.

Erica Surman, RN, BSN, Pediatric Trauma Program Manager, Beaumont Health System

Reference: http://www.aapcc.org/prevention/nppw/

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