Posts Tagged 'digital media'

Screen Savvy: The Value of Delayed Gratification

Older girl using iPad while little boy watches.

Cropped image. Petras Gagilas, Flickr. CC License.

How much screen time do your kids get?

If I’m being honest, mine (ages 13 and 10) get more than ideal on some many days. However, when they see me texting (not while driving!) or their dad playing a game or reading news on the iPad, it’s hard to say much about getting off the screens without looking more than a little hypocritical.

Some parents take an austerity approach. A recent New York Times article notes that Steve Jobs was “a low-tech parent”; his kids didn’t use their dad’s famous iPad and had significant screen time limitations. Parents who strictly limit technology cite concerns about exposure to inappropriate content (despite parental controls), cyberbullying, and the fear of their kids becoming addicted to the constant rush of information and potential for interaction or entertainment our electronic devices offer.

Most of us can relate to this concern. Bored? Grab the phone and play a game or check social media. Text coming in? “Better check who it is! Oh, that’s the chime of my email, I’d better open that too…” Depending on your phone settings, it can ding, chime, and beep notifications at you all day, letting you know there’s one more thing to grab your attention.

But even the screen-shunning set knows the value of letting your kids learn to self-monitor and use technology appropriately as they grow. Like any other tool, there are wonderful and horrible things we can do with technology. One reason gadgets are so appealing is immediate gratification. Most of the time, the information we’re seeking online is available within milliseconds, and if it isn’t, we start grumbling and shaking our phones (to get them to work faster?). Part of the issue may be that we — and our kids — need to remember how to wait. Building persistence and patience are important life skills.

Taking a break from the constant stream of cyberinfo can seem boring or sluggish at first. But you quickly realize there’s a lot to see and do, conversations to have, games to play, etc. If you’re trying to limit technology, you don’t have to be all-or-nothing, simply use baby steps and gradual changes.

Here are some ideas: Next time a text or email comes in, can you wait and mindfully respond in just a little bit? After dinner, can everyone clean up together and then take a brief walk rather than immediately separating and jumping on screens?

Pick limits that work for you and your family, and get used to the fun you can have off-line!

– Lori Warner, Ph.D., LP, BCBA-D, Director, HOPE Center at Beaumont Children’s Hospital

8 Things You Should Know About Colds, Flu and Antibiotics

antibiotics

Besides sharing recent holiday cheer, many shared viruses too. Knowing when antibiotics will help – and when they won’t – is key to preventing antibiotic resistance.

“We all need to remain smart about antibiotic use, and by ‘we,’ I mean doctors, nurses and patients,” says Christopher Carpenter, M.D., director of Beaumont’s Antimicrobial Stewardship Program. “We have a program that promotes appropriate antibiotic use in the hospital and with the help of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Michigan Antibiotic Resistance Reduction Coalition we are providing materials and education to encourage appropriate outpatient use in our Emergency Center and doctors’ offices.”

The CDC offers the following facts and tips:

  1. Colds, fl u and most sore throats and bronchitis are caused by viruses. Antibiotics do not help and may do more harm than good by increasing the risk of a resistant infection later.
  2. Antibiotic resistance – the development of “superbugs” that are resistant to available drugs – has been called one of the world’s most pressing public health problems.
  3. When antibiotics fail to work, the consequences are: longer-lasting illnesses; more doctor visits or extended hospital stays; and the need for more expensive and toxic medications. Some resistant infections can cause death.
  4. Children are of particular concern because they have the highest rates of antibiotic use. They also have the highest rate of infections caused by antibiotic-resistant “bugs.”
  5. Patients should not demand antibiotics when a health care provider has determined they are not needed.
  6. When an antibiotic is prescribed, take all of it, even if symptoms dis appear. If treatment stops too soon, some bacteria may survive and reinfect.
  7. The spread of viral infections like cold and fl u can be reduced through frequent handwashing and by avoiding close contact with others.
  8. Viral infections sometimes lead to bacterial infections. Keep your health care provider informed if your illness gets worse or lasts a long time.

Memorable Moments of 2013 From Beaumont Children’s Hospital

First lady of Michigan Sue Snyder at Beaumont Children's Hospital this past March

First lady of Michigan Sue Snyder at Beaumont Children’s Hospital this past March

One of the great things about health care is there is always the opportunity for growth — whether it be patient care, advances in research, in technology or more community support. Long one of the cornerstones of the science of medicine, Beaumont researchers are finding new and innovative ways to treat many conditions and illnesses. Here are some 2013 moments:

• Beaumont Children’s Hospital expanded its neuroscience services Jan. 7 with a Pediatric Epilepsy Clinic, offering treatment options and services for infants, children and teens with seizures and epilepsy.

• Beaumont Children’s Hospital opened a Sickle Cell Anemia Center offering comprehensive, specialized care for infants, children and adolescents with sickle cell anemia and sickle-thalassemia syndromes.

• In a study published in the April issue of the journal Resuscitation, Beaumont doctors found that cardiac arrests in K-12 schools are extremely rare, less than 0.2 percent, but out of 47 people who experienced cardiac arrest over a six-year period at K-12 schools, only 15 survived. Th e survival rate was three times greater, however, when bystanders used a device called an automated external defibrillator, or AED, that helps the heart restore a normal rhythm. Th e study “Cardiac Arrests in Schools: Assessing use of Automated External Defibrillators on School Campuses,” was led by principal investigator Robert Swor, D.O., Emergency Medicine physician at Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, and a research team including Edward Walton, M.D., Beaumont’s director of pediatric emergency medicine.

• It’s called PAWS – the pediatric advance warning score. Caregivers throughout Beaumont began using PAWS at the beginning of May to help predict if a child’s health status is likely to decline. Th e system also gives guidance for providers to follow when scores reach a particular number.

• After a successful year-long pilot at Beaumont Hospital, Troy, the Parenting Program is offering first-time parents in-room car seat safety education at both the Troy and Royal Oak hospitals. “We have one certified car seat safety technician at each hospital,” says Deanna Robb, director, Parenting Program. “They are especially sensitive to the high anxiety of new parents. Before we had this program in place, we provided families with a list of community resources, including Safety City U.S.A., but now parents can get a little more immediate security knowing how to properly use and install their car seat.”

• First lady of Michigan Sue Snyder announced her support of programs launched by the Michigan Departments of Human Services and Community Health to combat the nearly 150 fully preventable accidental suffocation infant deaths annually due to unsafe sleep environments. The announcement was made at Beaumont Children’s Hospital March 25.

• Beaumont offered the community a flu hotline to call with questions.

• At the Radiothon for Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals, a record-breaking $152,000 was raised for kids at Beaumont Children’s Hospital.

• Beaumont Health System announced a $5 million gift from Danialle and Peter Karmanos Jr. The gift will create the Karmanos Center for Natural Birth and the Danialle & Peter Karmanos Jr. Birth Center at Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak.

Here’s to a happy and healthy 2014! Happy New Year!

5 of My Favorite FREE Health and Safety Apps

iTriage Symptoms Checker

iTriage Symptoms Checker

  1. iTriage: iTriage was developed by two emergency room physicians and is available, for free, at both the Android Marketplace and iTunes App Store. What I like best about this app is the “find a facility” portion that can direct you to the nearest ER, Urgent Care, Community Health Center and Pharmacy. The facility locator is particularly appealing to me for when we are vacationing or away from home at sporting events. Additional features include symptom checker, physician locater by specialty, medical hotlines such as poison control and suicide hotline, as well as information on medications, medical conditions and procedures.
  2. Red Cross First Aid App: The American Red Cross has several great apps including alerts for hurricanes, tornados, earthquakes, wildfires and a shelter finder available through the iTunes App Store and on Google Play. The first aid app is free and, and lists several of the most common health emergencies as well as tips and videos on what to do should one of these events occur. Also included are preparedness checklists sorted by incident and several self-tests to evaluate your current knowledge.
  3. American Association of Poison Control Centers:  The American Association of Poison Control Centers has a free app in iTunes that has several features above and beyond putting you directly in touch with the nearest call center. You can call or email with a touch of a button. The AAPCC has trained medical professionals answer questions 24/7/365 for humans and pets at no charge. Some of the things that people call about are unintentional ingestions of medication or household products, food poisoning, sunburn, potential rabies infection, drug-food interactions, herbal or homeopathic supplements, adverse medication reaction, human food ingestion by pets, snakebites and substance abuse. This app also has some games and videos that may be interesting to kids. I think this app is especially good for babysitters and grandparents to have in the event of an accidental exposure.
  4. Consumer Product Safety Commission Recalls:  Available in iTunes and Android, the Consumer Product Safety Commission, CPSC, has an app that keeps you informed of the latest product recalls. In iTunes, the list can be viewed in several different categories including child, household, outdoor, sports as well as “all” recalls. It appears that with the Android app, you can search products as well as scan barcodes to see if they have been recalled.
  5. SafeCar By NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION: SafeCar is available in iTunes and offers the following features:
  • 5-Star Safety Ratings: Buy safe by looking up a vehicle’s crash test ratings and comparing ratings for different vehicles.
  • Recalls and Complaints: Drive safe by staying on top of safety issues for your vehicles. Record all your vehicles so you can be notified by NHTSA if a safety issue becomes known; the app also makes it simple to submit complaints to NHTSA when you believe there is a possible safety problem with your vehicle.
  • Help Installing Child Seats: Ensure your most precious passengers ride safe. Quickly find and get driving directions to where you can get assistance on making sure your child seats are properly installed, no matter where you are.
  • Safety Headlines and Alerts: Receive important news and information from NHTSA, as well as recall notices on your list of vehicles.

Have another safety App you like? Share it with us here.

Erica Surman, RN, BSN, Pediatric Trauma Program Manager, Beaumont Health System

5 Tips to Create a Family Picture Book That Inspires Reading

photobookIn the past I’ve given suggestions on creating a family library at home. The more books in your home, the better! Today I want to share an idea for a different kind of book to have in your home, a memory or picture book.

Gone are the days we are printing pictures and loading them into big, bulky photo albums. The new trend that seems to be sticking around is digital photo albums. Since my daughter was 2, she’s been pulling our family picture books off the shelf to “read.” Here are some tips on how to get started in organizing and creating these memory books that will last a lifetime!

  1. Upload your photos from your phone and camera every other week. Place them in a folder on your computer. I label my photo albums with three months in each. January-March, April-June, July-September, and October-December. I also place videos in these folders.
  2. Once a month, upload your photos to an online digital photography site. My favorite is Shutterfly (enter link). They offer loads of discounts and the site is user friendly.
  3. At the end of the each quarter, I burn a dvd of our photos and videos to preserve or you can put them on an external hard drive. Remember, they will also be backed up on Shutterfly.
  4. Now’s the fun part! Using the creative layouts, enter your pictures into a photo album online. I organize mine by month in the book and add captions here and there for us to read together. At times I get fancy using their extra embellishments through out the year, or I simply enter the pictures and click save. It all depends on how much time you want to spend on the design part of your album.
  5. Finally, in January every year, I wait for the 50% off photo books coupon code to be emailed (because it always shows up) and I order our family yearbook.

What you are creating with digital albums is a book filled with your happy memories. It’s a book that will not collect dust on your shelf. You can also share this book with family members online. It will be saved in your account if you ever choose to order additional copies.

— Maria Dismondy, mother of two, reading specialist, fitness instructor and bestselling children’s author living in Southeast Michigan

To see read more posts by Maria and about literacy, click the Literacy tag or type the author’s name in the search box.

Kid-Coveted & Mom-Approved Apps For Kindle and iPad

Proof that literacy learning happens on our iPad. My daughter typed out a message for her dad.

Proof that literacy learning happens on our iPad. My daughter typed a message for her dad.

 

As a part of my Reading Readiness Series here on Beaumont’s Parenting Program Blog, I wanted to take some time to review the greatest apps (according to my daughter and I) for toddlers and preschoolers on both the Kindle Fire and Apple iPad. I will be sure to review apps for older children in my next reading series, which will be for elementary-aged children.

I have pretty strict rules when it comes to screen time in our house. It’s just my thing. (We’ll save that for another blog post.)  However, once I got a glimpse at what the iPad had to offer for literacy learning activities, I purchased one for the family and have been extremely happy ever since.

All the following games have been tried and tested by my three-year-old and me. Please remember to always monitor your children while they are on an electronic device.

Kindle Fire

1. BT Handwriting: This app gives children the opportunity to use their fine motor skills to practice tracing capital letters. It says the name of the word, the sound and associates a picture with the word. This is the free version. You can then upgrade to the full version that includes numbers, writing your name and lowercase letters.

2. Jump Start Preschool: There is a free version but the full version is totally worth it. On this app children can build puzzles, play a sound box, listen to stories, learn about numbers, match letters to animal names, sort shapes and more! What we really like about this app is that it has a number of activities that strengthen reading readiness.

3. Dora’s ABCs: This app is simple as far as the activities go. However, the tasks are for children who have a solid understanding of most of the letter sounds. Children practice beginning, middle and ending sounds. There is also an activity to practice rhyming words.

 PrincessFairyTaleMakerApp

Apple iPad

1.     Duck, Duck Moose Princess Fairy Tale Maker: A friend of ours just recently recommended this app to us. We love it! It is not a free app. Children use characters and backgrounds to create a story scene. Then, they have the option to use a record feature to tell their story. The only downside I see to this app is that there is no way to email the story or save it to your computer to keep forever! I am having so much fun hearing my three year old tell stories.

2.     Letter School: This free app is like BT Handwriting on the Kindle Fire but with better graphics. Children practice writing lower and upper case letters. There is a catchy tune they sing for each of the letters that repeats the name of the letter, the sound and an object that is associated with it.

3.     Phone For Kids: What are your toddler and preschoolers favorite toys? It’s not the remote control truck or dollhouse you spent big bucks on. Typically their favorite gadgets are your remote controls and cell phone! That’s why we love this free app. It’s a smart phone and has learning involved. Children can send texts, hear letter names, dial pretend phone numbers, paint and learn about different types of weather.

Something that has really worked for our family when it comes to managing time on the device is using a kitchen timer. I also organized the apps into two categories. One titled “Learn” and one titled “Play” She has to make choices from both categories each time she plays on the iPad. This way I know she is not only dressing Hello Kitty the entire time, but she is also playing some great learning apps too.

FisherPriceTouchPad

We recently received the Fisher Price Laugh and Learn Case that has come in handy protecting our device from messy and fumble fingered children!

– Maria Dismondy, mother of two, reading specialist, fitness instructor and bestselling children’s author living in Southeast Michigan.

Dangers Could Be Lurking in Your Home Office

This is part of a series about making your home child-safe room by room, inside and out. Make sure you’re subscribed to get tips for every room.

Your home office might be set up for you, but it’s a good idea to make sure every area in your home is child-friendly. While older children might be more apt to use your computer, there are plenty of other items that could cause concern.

  • Secure large items such as bookshelves to the wall with furniture safety brackets to prevent tip overs.
  • Keep paper shredders unplugged and out of the way of children. Their hair or clothes can become entrapped.
  • Do not overload outlets or use extension cords! Use an appropriate circuit breaker that will shut off the current if an overload occurs. Overloaded outlets are a major cause of house fires.
  • Talk with your kids about internet safety including online predators and cyber bullying. Monitor them closely when they are online and be on high alert for at risk signs such as spending a lot of time online at night. See more from the FBI’s guide here.
  • Set parental controls on computers not in family areas of your home.

Check out tips on other rooms here and here.

Erica Surman, RN, BSN, Pediatric Trauma Program Manager, Beaumont Health System


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