Posts Tagged 'Recipe'

Meet the avocado

halved avocado in bowl

You may be inclined to call an avocado a vegetable but did you know it is technically a fruit? (It’s a single-seeded berry to be exact.) Avocados are nutrient powerhouses, providing 20 different vitamins in minerals per serving, including potassium, B vitamins, folate, vitamin C and E, as well as natural plant chemicals that may help prevent cancer.

About avocados

  • Avocados are nutritious, but they are very calorie dense so you need to consume them in moderation.
  • The recommended serving size is smaller than you may think as 1/5 of a medium avocado (or 1 ounce) is 50 calories and 4 grams of fat.
  • They are naturally low in sugar and contain fiber which helps you feel full longer.
  • They are high in monounsaturated fat which is the “good” fat that helps lower bad cholesterol.
    • The American Heart Association recommends a diet high in fruits and vegetables and up to 30 percent of calories from mainly unsaturated fat.

Incorporating avocado into your day

  • Choose avocados instead of fats that are high in saturated fats like butter or cheese.
  • Use it as a spread in place of cream cheese or mayo.
  • Make guacamole.
  • Add it to a salad.
  • Make an avocado salad (see recipe below).
  • Add it to a smoothie for added creaminess.
  • Top an omelet.
  • Add it to your favorite soup.
  • Add a delicious creamy topping to your fish or chicken.
  • Simply enjoy it right out of the peel.

Avocado salad

avocado and black bean salad

image credit: Jennifer Segal, seriouseats.com

Ingredients

  • 2 cups corn, preferably fresh or frozen (about 2 cobs)
  • 1 (15-ounce) can black beans, rinsed and drained
  • 2/3 cup red onion, finely chopped
  • 1/4 cup fresh cilantro
  • 3 tablespoons fresh lime juice
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 medium avocado, peeled and cubed

Directions

  • Combine all the ingredients.
  • Add the avocado last to prevent it from breaking apart.

Yield

Makes 8 servings.  Serving size equals ¾ cup.  Each serving counts as 1 starch and 1 fat.

Nutrition analysis per serving

  • Calories: 130
  • Fat: 6 grams
  • Cholesterol: 0 milligrams
  • Sodium: 260 milligrams
  • Carbohydrates: 20 grams
  • Fiber: 5 grams
  • Sugar: 1 gram
  • Protein: 4 grams

– Natalie Raymond, R.D. is a clinical dietitian with the Beaumont Weight Control Center in St. Clair Shores. The Beaumont Weight Control Center offers cooking demonstrations to the community. View a list of current demonstrations here.

Summer salads to bring to your next BBQ

chopped vegetable confetti salad

image credit: fooddonelight

With summer right around the corner, what better way to celebrate than with some fresh vegetables? As one of the dietetic interns at Beaumont, I wanted to share two of my favorite salad recipes with you. I love to eat salad, especially in the summer time and with so many delicious vegetables to choose from, I like making a different salad every day and trying new recipes. There are so many temptations in summer from graduation parties, holidays, and birthday parties, but bringing a salad to one of your social events will keep you full, on track, and it’s sure to be a hit at the festivity.

Chopped Vegetable Confetti Salad (pictured above)

Ingredients:

  • 4 cups cauliflower, roughly chopped
  • 4 cups broccoli, roughly chopped
  • 2 cups carrot, roughly chopped
  • 2 cups celery, roughly chopped
  • 1 red pepper, roughly chopped
  • 1 cup onion, roughly chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • ½ cup fat-free Italian dressing
  • Fresh ground black pepper to taste
  • *Note: To save time buy your vegetables pre-cut at your local grocery store

Directions:

  1. Place cauliflower into a food processor and pulse until cauliflower is very finely diced. Pour into a large bowl.
  2. Repeat with broccoli and remaining vegetables, one at a time.
  3. Add the minced garlic to other vegetables.
  4. Pour dressing over vegetables and toss well and season with pepper.
  5. Refrigerate for an hour and serve. (Counts as low starch vegetables.)

Yield:

10 servings

Recipe adapted from https://fooddonelight.com/chopped-vegetable-confetti-salad/#_a5y_p=1560257

Creamy Tomato and Cucumber Salad

Ingredients:

creamy cucumber and tomato salad

image credit: Natasha’s Kitchen

  • 3 medium tomatoes
  • 2 medium cucumbers
  • ½ medium onion
  • 1 large garlic clove
  • 3 tablespoons fat-free mayo
  • 2 tablespoons fat-free sour cream or plain Greek yogurt
  • ⅛ teaspoon pepper
  • Salt to taste

Directions:

  1. Cut tomatoes into 1-inch pieces.
  2. Cut cucumbers in half and slice, then thinly slice the onion.
  3. Combine all the prepared vegetables in a medium bowl.
  4. In a small bowl, combine mayo, sour cream or plain Greek yogurt, garlic, and pepper. Mix well.  Mix the dressing into the vegetables.
  5. Add salt to taste just before serving. (Counts as low starch vegetables.)

Yield:

6 servings

Recipe adapted from http://natashaskitchen.com/2010/08/16/creamy-cucumber-and-tomato-salad/

– Chelsea Bono is dietetic intern going through the Beaumont Dietetic Internship program.

Easy taco salad

taco salad

Cropped image. Theresa Carpenter, Flickr. CC license.

Ingredients:

  1. Choose low-starch vegetables (unlimited):
  • Lettuce
  • Tomatoes
  • Bell pepper
  • Onion
  1. Choose one protein (or two halves)
  • ¾ cup beans (black, red, pinto, kidney)
  • 4 ounces ground turkey
  • 1 cup ground meat-free crumbles (e.g., Yves Veggie Ground Round, Smart Ground)
  • ⅓ cup light shredded cheese (½ protein)
  1. Choose one starch
  • ½ cup corn
  • ½ cup beans
  • 1 ounce baked tortilla chips (e.g., Guiltless Gourmet)
  1. Choose two fats (optional)
  • ⅛ avocado
  • 8 large olives
  • 2 tablespoons reduced-fat sour cream
  1. Make the dressing

Mix together:

  • 1 packet 40% less sodium taco seasoning mix
  • 1 cup reduced-fat sour cream
  • ¼ cup skim milk

 Yield:

A standard dinner meal: one protein serving, 100 calorie starch serving, unlimited low starch vegetables, and two fat servings to equal approximately 400 calories.

Variation: 

Mix meat with taco seasoning mix and toss salad with salsa.

Dressing nutrition analysis per 2 tablespoon serving:

  • Calories: 36
  • Fat: 2g
  • Cholesterol: 8 mg
  • Sodium: 181 mg
  • Carbohydrates: 6 g
  • Protein: 5 g

– Mary Ligotti-Hitch, R.D. is a registered dietitian with the Weight Control Center at Beaumont Health Center. Beaumont Weight Control Center offers cooking demonstrations to the community. View a list of current demonstrations here.

Oatmeal chocolate chip softies

oatmeal chocolate chip cookies on cooling rack

Unaltered image. Ted Major, Flickr. CC license.

Ingredients

  • ¼ cup brown sugar (not packed)
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 2 tablespoons light whipped butter or light buttery spread, room temperature
  • 2 tablespoons unsweetened applesauce
  • 2 tablespoons fat-free liquid egg substitute (e.g., Egg Beaters® Original)
  • ¼ teaspoon vanilla extract
  • ⅓ cup whole wheat flour
  • ¼ teaspoon baking powder
  • ⅛ teaspoon salt
  • ½ cup old-fashioned oats
  • 2 tablespoons semi-sweet mini chocolate chips
  • ½ ounce (about 2 tablespoons) chopped macadamia nuts or walnuts

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350° F. Spray a baking sheet with nonstick spray.
  2. In a medium bowl, thoroughly whisk brown sugar, sugar, butter, applesauce, egg substitute and vanilla extract.
  3. Add flour, baking powder and salt. Stir until smooth.
  4. Fold in oats and chopped chocolate chips.
  5. Spoon batter onto the baking sheet in six evenly spaced mounds. Use the back of a spoon to spread and flatten batter into 3-inch circles. Top with chopped nuts, and lightly pat to adhere.
  6. Bake until a toothpick inserted into the center of a softie comes out clean, about 10 minutes.

Yield

Makes 6 servings.
(Serving size equals 1 softie. Each serving counts as 1 starch serving.)

Nutrition analysis per serving

  • Calories: 140
  • Fat: 5 g
  • Saturated Fat: 2 g
  • Trans Fat: 0 g
  • Cholesterol: 5 mg
  • Sodium: 110 mg
  • Carbohydrate: 21 g
  • Fiber: 2 g
  • Sugars: 11 g
  • Protein: 3 g
Recipe adapted from hungry-girl.com.

– Mary Ligotti-Hitch, R.D. is a registered dietitian with the Weight Control Center at Beaumont Health Center. Learn more about the Weight Control Center

Roasted Brussels sprouts with apples: Your new Thanksgiving side

roasted Brussels sprouts and apples

image credit: Cooking Light

Why Brussels sprouts?

Brussels sprouts or “mini cabbages” are easy to cook and seriously good for you. Not only are Brussels sprouts a super food, but they make a delicious main dish or addition to any meal for any season! Whether you bake, grill, or sauté them, they are packed with flavor and nutritional benefits. They make a great side dish to any meal or special occasion.

Small, tender Brussels sprouts are usually sweeter and milder than larger sprouts, especially when cooked only until tender-crisp, not overcooked. Belgians traditionally season Brussels sprouts with nutmeg, but fruit, herbs and nuts also complement the flavor and balance the vegetable’s characteristic bitterness.

Nutritional benefits galore

Brussels sprouts are a cruciferous vegetable, which means they are rich in vitamins and minerals such as folate, vitamin K, vitamin A and vitamin C. They’re also rich in phytonutrients — plant-based compounds that may help to lower inflammation and reduce the risk of developing cancer. Cruciferous vegetables are also rich in fiber and low in calories, a combination that will help you feel full and satisfied without overeating.

It doesn’t take much to reap the benefits. Adults need at least 2½ cups of vegetables a day. One cup of raw and cooked veggies is equivalent to a 1-cup vegetable serving.

Roasted Brussels Sprouts and Apples

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup diced apple
  • 8 ounces Brussels sprouts, trimmed and quartered
  • 2 tablespoons apple cider
  • 2 teaspoons olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon minced fresh thyme
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 375° F.
  2. Combine apple and Brussels sprouts in an 11 x 7-inch baking dish.
  3. Add apple cider, olive oil, minced fresh thyme, salt, and freshly ground black pepper; toss well.
  4. Bake at 375° for 25 minutes or until sprouts are tender.

Yield

Makes 2 servings (Serving size equals 3/4 cup.)

Nutrition analysis per serving

  • Calories: 109
  • Fat: 9 g
  • Saturated fat: 7 g
  • Monounsaturated fat: 3 g
  • Polyunsaturated fat: 7 g
  • Cholesterol: 0 mg
  • Protein: 6 g
  • Carbohydrate: 8 g
  • Fiber: 7 g
  • Sodium: 321 mg
  • Iron: 6 mg
  • Calcium: 47 mg

Source: http://www.cookinglight.com/entertaining/holidays-occasions/holiday-cookbook-sides/roasted-brussels-sprouts-apples-healthy-holiday-recipes

Source: http://www.eatright.org/resource/food/vitamins-and-supplements/nutrient-rich-foods/the-beginners-guide-to-cruciferous-vegetables

– Jessica Helmick, R.D. is a registered dietitian with the Weight Control Center at Beaumont Health Center.

Swiss oats with apples and walnuts

 

Various breakfast foods and "September is Better Breakfast Month" text

image credit: nationaldaycalendar.com

 

Breakfast is named such because you “break the fast” after a good night’s sleep. Eating within an hour of rising kick starts your metabolism, replenishes your body’s supply of glucose, and helps keep your energy levels up throughout the day.

Did you know that regularly eating a healthy breakfast may also help you lose excess weight and maintain your weight loss? When you skip breakfast, you may be more tempted to reach for a quick fix like doughnuts or Pop-Tarts; you’ll end up feeling hungry much sooner when choosing high sugar, processed foods, and that can lead to overeating throughout the day. If you start your day out with something healthy, you’re more likely to make healthy choices over the course of your day. The prolonged fasting that occurs when you skip breakfast can also increase your body’s insulin response, which can increase fat storage and lead to weight gain.

As you can see, breakfast is very important for our health and well-being!

Start the day out right with this autumn-inspired Swiss Oats with Apples and Walnuts recipe. The fiber from the oats and apples paired with the monounsaturated fat from the walnuts will help you feel fuller longer, which helps to maintain a healthy weight to lower your risk of diabetes and heart disease.

Ingredients:

  • 1 ½ cups dry oats (quick-cooking or old fashioned)
  • 1 ¼ cups skim or plain soy milk
  • 2 Tbsp. honey
  • ½ tsp. cinnamon
  • 3 cups chopped apples
  • ¼ cups chopped walnuts

Directions:

  1. The night before; stir together oats, milk, honey and cinnamon in a large bowl. Allow to soak in the refrigerator overnight.
  2. In the morning, add the apples and walnuts.
  3. Gently mix together and serve.

Yield

Makes 4 servings (Serving size equals ¾ cup.)

– Kayleigh Delaney is a Beaumont Dietetic intern with the Beaumont Health Center’s Weight Control Center. Learn more about the Weight Control Center.

 

Orange-Pineapple Cake

Closeup of orange pineapple cake

Cake Ingredients

  • 1 package (16.5 ounce) white cake mix (e.g., Duncan Hines®)
  • 3 large egg whites
  • ½ cup unsweetened applesauce
  • 1 can (10.5 ounces) mandarin oranges packed in water
  • Nonstick cooking spray

Frosting Ingredients

  • 10 ounces crushed pineapple in own juice
  • ½ of a small box (1 ounce) instant sugar free, fat free vanilla pudding
  • 4 ounces reduced fat whipped topping (e.g., Cool Whip®)

Cake Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350° F.
  2. In a large bowl, beat the cake mix, egg whites, applesauce, and oranges with juice on low speed for 2 minutes.
  3. Pour into a 13 x 9 inch baking dish coated with cooking spray.
  4. Bake for 25 – 30 minutes or until toothpick inserted near the center comes out clean.
  5. Cool cake completely before frosting.

Frosting Directions

  1. In a bowl, combine the pineapple and pudding mix.
  2. Fold in whipped topping just until blended.
  3. Spread over cake.
  4. Refrigerate for at least 1 hour before serving.

Yield

Makes 16 servings (Serving size equals approximately 2 x 3 inch piece of cake.) Each serving counts as 2 starch servings.

Nutrition analysis per serving:

  • Calories: 180
  • Fat: 5 g
  • Saturated Fat: 5 g
  • Trans Fat: 0 g
  • Cholesterol: 0 mg
  • Sodium: 240 mg
  • Carbohydrates: 34 g
  • Fiber: 1 g
  • Sugar: 24 g
  • Protein: 2 g

– Mary Ligotti-Hitch, R.D. is a registered dietitian with the Weight Control Center at Beaumont Health Center. Beaumont Weight Control Center offers free cooking demonstrations to the community. View a list of current demonstrations here.


Topics

Enter your email address and you'll receive notifications of new posts in your in-box.

Join 2,733 other followers

Free Developmental Screening

Confidential online developmental screening for children up to age 5

Awards