Posts Tagged 'services'

Fun support for speech and language challenges

Pediatric speech therapy

Parents often wonder if they’re doing everything they can to help their children succeed. That’s part of the reason there are so many kid-centered programs available in our community. Many of those groups and classes focus on supporting children’s social and academic growth, as well as engaging them in fun activities.

But what if you want those same things for the children in your life who have speech and language delays? Perhaps you’ve spoken with your pediatrician, initiated an evaluation and treatment, and are doing the home activities provided by your clinician. How can parents provide more, while keeping things appropriate for children with varied abilities and challenges?

Beaumont Health offers various group programs for children with communication difficulties through The Center for Childhood Speech and Language Disorders. These groups support and enhance the individual treatment in which children participate. Most of our group programs run year-round, so there are opportunities to participate throughout the school year and during the summer months as well. In order to provide an optimal experience, children are placed in groups based upon their skills and needs, as well as their ages and schedule availability.

Lil’ Sprouts. The Lil’ Sprouts group program is an educational course designed for parents/caregivers along with their children between the ages of 18 months to 2 ½ years. The goal of this program is to teach parents/caregivers how to increase speech and language within their home environment.

Toddler Group. The Toddler Language Stimulation Program supports expressive language development and speech clarity skills within a peer group. Children between 2 and 3 years old participate in functional, hands-on group activities that promote independent communication skills.

PALS. The PALS group is an intervention program targeting social communication and language development for children with Autism Spectrum Disorders. Play-based activities are used to target early communication skills including joint attention, eye contact, initiation and requesting, play skills, turn-taking, and transitioning.

PEP Group. The Pragmatic Enrichment Program (PEP) is designed to teach children with language impairments to interact comfortably with their peers. The goal is to help the child have more positive social relationships and more success interacting in the classroom setting. Specific areas of social interactive and pragmatic skills are addressed, and coordinated with children’s individual goals.

Literacy Group. The Literacy Program is aimed at preparing children between the ages of 4 and 7 years for early literacy intervention. Sessions focus on phonological awareness skills including sound-letter correspondence, sound blending, and other skills needed for reading.

There are four metro Detroit locations available to serve the community, including Royal Oak, Grosse Pointe, West Bloomfield, and Macomb Township.

Talk to your pediatrician if you have concerns about your child’s speech and language development. An evaluation by a speech-language pathologist can determine if your child could benefit from individual or group treatment options.

– Emily Rogers, M.A., CCC-SLP, Speech and Language Pathologist, Children’s Speech and Language Pathology Department, Beaumont Health

Getting help through pediatric OT and PT services

Therapist working with a little girl and blocks

Many families ask how to get their children enrolled in physical, occupational or speech therapy.

If you’re a parent and noticing motor or speech delays in your child, a good place to start is at the pediatrician’s office. Pediatricians are excellent at screening motor milestones, listening to parents’ concerns, and making the appropriate referral to one of our outpatient locations. We see children diagnosed with developmental delay, torticollis, cerebral palsy, injury/trauma, toe walking/difficulty walking, hemiplegia, sensory processing disorder, feeding difficulties, incontinence, and various other diagnoses. A child will require a script from the physician that states physical therapy, occupational therapy and/or speech therapy: evaluate and treat.

Another time when a child may require our services is upon discharge from the hospital. We recommend that all children discharged from the NICU receive evaluations from our skilled team of clinicians. Even while the child is in the hospital, he may also receive our services. At the time of discharge, the clinician or the physician may make the referral to one of our five outpatient locations: Royal Oak, Grosse Pointe, West Bloomfield, Macomb and the Center for Exceptional Families located in Dearborn, depending on which location is closest to your home. A good tip is to have the physician at the hospital include the script along with the discharge paperwork. Once the script is obtained, the parent just has to call the office and set up an appointment time.

All of our locations believe in a team approach in order to treat the child holistically. Our specialized therapists collaborate with the patient’s family and team of physicians to develop customized treatment plans. We typically see children from birth to age 16, although sometimes patients are older depending on the diagnosis. At the time of the evaluation, the clinician will recommend the most appropriate frequency to achieve success. The frequency is generally highest at the initiation of treatment and then decreases as the child meets his or her goals over time.

Each child progresses at his or her own rate and the treatment plan is tailored to success. The treatment sessions are individual; however the child may be recommended for a group session which is offered year round. We see success from the individual treatment sessions and the groups. Sometimes children progress quicker in a group setting along with their peers, and it can be fun. Some of our most popular groups are: dance, yoga, little crunchers/big munchers (feeding groups), social groups and handwriting without tears.

Eventually the child will be discharged from therapy services when the individual goals are met or when services are no longer recommended. However discharge doesn’t mean goodbye forever. We may close the child’s chart for a period of time, but we recommend that parents keep us updated on their child’s progress and home exercise program success. It’s not uncommon for children to require additional services as they grow and encounter new challenges.

Our team is here to support your child’s growth and optimize their success.

– Christina Paniccia PT, DPT, is a pediatric supervisor at Neighborhood Club, Beaumont, Grosse Pointe.

Empty arms: The complicated grief of perinatal loss and how Beaumont can help

 Lots of lit tealight candles

Today, October 15, is National Pregnancy and Infant Loss Remembrance Day.

For many parents, the moment they learn they’re expecting, they begin to attach to their baby. They begin planning. Dreaming. Thinking about all they want and hope for their yet-to-be born child.

The greatest heartbreak is when there is a pregnancy loss. This loss is often devastating because it’s not only the loss of a child, but the loss of all the hopes and dreams parents had for their child. Intense grieving often follows.

Many parents who’ve suffered the loss of their baby find much comfort and support in Beaumont’s Looking Ahead Bereaved Parents Support Group, a group specifically designed to meet the needs of parents who’ve lost a baby.

How our group can help

Our support group focuses on the very specific loss involved in pregnancy, stillbirth or death of an infant. Our members find the group particularly helpful because they’re with others who’ve experienced a similar loss. Parents can really express the intensity of their loss openly.

Tips for your support system

Often family, friends and co-workers may mean well with their comments and reactions, but sometimes these are hurtful as well. Comments like “Your baby’s an angel in heaven now,” “It’s for the best,” “You’ll get pregnant again soon,” “Why are you still so sad?” are upsetting.

Instead, it’s best for family members and friends to just listen and be non-judgmental. The best response is often as simple as “I’m so sorry for your loss.”

It’s also helpful to recall and remember the baby who died. Refer to the baby by name. One of the greatest concerns that grieving parents have is that their child will be forgotten. Grieving parents want and need acknowledgment that their baby existed. That they are parents and their baby mattered and is remembered.

Join us

Our Looking Ahead Bereaved Parents Support Group is a drop-in group, so pre-registration isn’t necessary. Parents can come to just one group, or attend monthly. The group is facilitated by Judy Kotzen, LMSW, a medical social worker at Beaumont Health.

  • When: The second Tuesday of every month from 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.
  • Where: Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak in the Administration Building West (AB-West) at 3601 W 13 Mile Rd, Royal Oak, Michigan 48073. Enter in the Administration Building’s main entrance, then follow the signs to the private dining room on the first floor.
  • Parking: Park in the South Deck (green)

For additional information

Please contact Judy Kotzen at (248) 898-7219.

Lil’ Sprouts: A Parent/Child Educational Program

Offered by the Beaumont Children’s Hospital Center for Childhood Speech and Language Disorders, Lil’ Sprouts is a 10-week course designed for parents/caregivers with their children. The goal of this program is to teach parents/caregivers how to increase speech and language within their home environment. Children enrolled may be developing at a normal/average rate or may be delayed in speech and language development. Children are between the ages of 18 months and 2½ years. Due to limited space, we request that siblings do not attend the Lil’ Sprout sessions.

Session Format

  • We meet for 10 consecutive Tuesdays from 5:00 – 5:50 p.m.
  • The first 25 minutes of each session: We discuss our topic and teach you and your child how to complete a task related to our topic.
  • The next 10 minutes are spent at a table for a snack. During snack time, the clinician will help the children use word approximations, sign language, or simple words to request for food.
  • The final 10 minutes: We do a circle time activity and sing a song related to our weekly topic.

Each week your family is given a handout with home program ideas and ways for you to increase your child’s speech and language development at home. Please feel free to interact with other families in the group. This is a time to find out what works for other families and try ideas out on your own!

Summer Term Schedule

  • Week 1: First Day! Speech and Sound Development and Sign Language
  • Week 2: The Development of Receptive Language Skills (Part 1 of 2)
  • Week 3: The Development of Receptive Language Skills (Part 2 of 2)
  • Week 4: The Development of Expressive Language Skills (Part 1 of 2)
  • Week 5: The Development of Expressive Language Skills (Part 2 of 2)
  • Week 6: The Interaction of Play Skills and Communication
  • Week 7: The Interaction of Sensory Skills and Communication
  • Week 8: The Interaction of Oral Motor Skills and Communication
  • Week 9: Idea and Toy Exchange
  • Week 10: Last Day! Wrap Up and Review and Recommendations

Enrollment Information

  • The summer term runs June 16 – Aug. 18, 2015.
  • Sessions will be held at the Beaumont Health Center in Royal Oak and the Beaumont Medical Office Building in West Bloomfield. Please contact one of the locations if youare interested in enrolling for the summer term.
    • Royal Oak: (248) 655-5975
    • West Bloomfield: (248) 855-4480
  • We will be taking payments during the first class. If you need to set up a payment plan, we will do so during the first visit. There are no refunds for this group program.

5 Important Numbers to Plug in Your Teen’s Phone Today

A teenage couple using cell phones

Many teens have cell phones, and if not a phone, some other portal to the Internet. These are five numbers that should be made available to every teen simply by adding them to the contact list. Some of these topics are extremely heavy, so it’s ideal to discuss what to do in conjunction with dialing or sharing these numbers.

1. Poison Control: (800) 222-1222

This is a great number to have for teens who babysit or even just watch younger siblings. However, poison control isn’t just for babies. Some topics that may impact teens include drug or alcohol use, improper use of over-the-counter or prescription medication, teen trends including the “cinnamon challenge”, side effects from energy drinks, carbon monoxide poisoning, eye or skin exposure to a chemical, insect or animal bites, poison ivy, mixing cleaners and food poisoning.

Parent message: Let your kids know that it’s OK to talk to you if they’re concerned about a friend’s, or their own, drinking or drug use. Also discuss when calling Poison Control is appropriate, and when to dial 911 instead.

2. NoBLE/Common Ground Bullying Hotline: (855) UR-NOBLE (855-876-6253)

Beaumont Health’s NoBLE (No Bullying Live Empowered) program has a 24/7 bullying hotline operated by Common Ground, a non-profit crisis intervention agency. In addition to the hotline, NoBLE has additional resources available to help support kids affected by bullying.

Parent message: Talk to your kids about bullying, including why it’s important to not be a bully or a bully bystander. Let them know to talk to you if they are being bullied, or if they witness bullying of one of their peers.

3. Love is Respect, a project of the National Domestic Violence Hotline: (866) 331-9474

The statistics for teen dating violence is shocking. According to loveisrespect.org, “One in three adolescents in the U.S. is a victim of physical, sexual, emotional or verbal abuse from a dating partner, a figure that far exceeds rates of other types of youth violence”. Teens often have little experience in relationships and aren’t always able to identify when behavior is considered “abuse”.

Parent message: Make sure to let your children know that they can talk with you about personal things and that you won’t overreact. If they believe you can handle problems together, they may feel more inclined to talk to you about behavior that makes them uncomfortable. Visit the Love is Respect site and review the warning signs of abuse together so they will know if things are getting dangerous.

4. National Eating Disorder Association: (800) 931-2237

Having access to the Internet can lead those suffering with eating disorders to the wrong kind of “support” by finding those who enable this disease.

If you type certain eating disorder “code words” into the Instagram search features, a warning pops up advising of possible graphic content. It gives the option to click “learn more” and you’ll be directed to an Instagram page with information about eating disorders and links where to get help.

If you do the same search on Pinterest, a banner message appears with the message: “Eating disorders are not lifestyle choices; they are mental disorders that if left untreated can cause serious health problems or could even be life-threatening. For treatment referrals, information, and support, you can always contact the National Eating Disorders Association Helpline at 1-800-931-2237 or
www.nationaleatingdisorders.org”.

The National Institute of Heath reports that eating disorders frequently begin in the teen years and that girls are at a 2½ times greater risk.

Parent message: Make healthy body image a family priority. Be aware of the signs of each different eating disorder listed here. Two newer eating disorders include Diabulemia, a disorder specific to those with Type 1 Diabetes, and Orthorexia Nervosa, which occurs when healthy eating becomes an obsession.

5. The National Suicide Prevention Hotline: (800) 273-8255

Chances are your teen has heard about, or known someone who has committed suicide. According to the Centers for Disease Control, suicide is the third-leading cause of death for people age 10–24. Unfortunately, there’s a huge stigma attached to suicide, and it isn’t openly discussed. Often family and friends didn’t realize their loved one was suffering.

Parent message: Talk to your teen about suicide. It’s an extremely uncomfortable topic to discuss, but it’s very important to establish an open dialogue. Discuss the warning signs. Let them know that they can talk to you about anything, including thoughts of hurting themselves or concern for friends exhibiting these behaviors. Instruct your teen that it’s imperative to tell you right away if anyone they know talks about committing suicide, even if your child thinks they’re joking or exaggerating.

– Erica Surman, RN, BSN, Pediatric Trauma Program Manager, Beaumont Health System

100,000 Families: A Milestone to Celebrate!

Woman with interacting with 2 babies

Shout it from the mountain tops! Put on your party hats! Break out in dance! Rejoice in song! This week, the Parenting Program celebrates providing support and education to over 100,000 families! Woo! Woo!

A Bit of History

The Beaumont Parenting Program began 34 years ago as a research project with Michigan State University. With a focus on community outreach and primary prevention, this free program was designed to provide a safe environment where new parents could share, learn and grow together. Central to the project: matching experienced, trained parent volunteers with new parents to help educate and mentor them.

Ever-Growing, Ever-Changing

Since its inception in 1980, Beaumont’s Parenting Program continues to grow in scope and size. What began as a small “neighborhood” project, with only a handful of volunteers, has grown into a program with over 300 dedicated volunteers who provide support and education to more than 5,000 families annually. As market trends shift and family’s needs change, our program continues to evolve finding new and innovative ways to meet the needs of the community. Some recent highlights include:

  • In 2008 we became the first hospital in southeast Michigan, among only a handful of hospitals in the nation, to develop a comprehensive program focused on postpartum adjustments and depression.
  • In 2009 the Parenting Program developed Beaumont’s first consumer Facebook fan page that now has a following of close to 2,000 fans.
  • In 2010 we launched Beaumont’s first consumer blog for new parents. In the first two months, we had over 4,000 viewers and now we have a fan base that reaches out to over 91 countries.
  • In 2012 we successfully launched an “in-room” car seat safety education program.

Award Winning and Unique to Beaumont Health

We are especially proud that for almost 35 years, we have what no other hospital in the state of Michigan has: an award-winning Parenting Program. When comparing our local and national hospital systems, there is no other hospital-based program that offers such in-depth and comprehensive services. Presented with two national awards in the past five years, the Parenting Program continues to be commended for inspiring community impact, collaboration, innovation and best practices. Recognized as a “Program of Excellence” and considered a “Jewel in the Community,” the Parenting Program is a shining example of service at its best. It embodies the true spirit of giving and generosity. It embodies the true mission of Beaumont Health.

Program Impact

When you stop to think about the sheer number and measurement of “100,000” families, it is indeed an astounding sum and achievement. But when you think about the true impact, the uniqueness is in the stories from the touch of one person to a plenitude of families. The stories come in many shapes and many forms and the paths lead to incredible accounts of success, dedication, compassion, friendships, heroic actions, and even life-saving measures.

Volunteers are the Foundation of Our Success

Beaumont Parenting Program Advisory Board

At the heart of the Parenting Program is a group of compassionate and dedicated volunteers who give selflessly of their time and passion to help provide support to new parents. A special shout out to all of our volunteers past and present: It is through your efforts that we have been able to support and educate over 100,000 Beaumont families. Thank you for making every effort to ensure that our focus and commitment remains on the needs of our children and their families, that our focus remains on building a strong and healthy community. To our amazing volunteers, keep your passion for new parents filled with the genuine belief that you are making a difference in the world each and every day.

A very special thanks goes out to our amazing staff, generous donors, and our community partners for your dedication and commitment to serving the diverse needs of our community.

We are filled with great pride and exuberance as we announce this major achievement. Please “like” this post if you are proud and exuberant too!

This post is dedicated to Beth Frydlewicz, our fearless leader of the Parenting Program for more than 25 years. You are an inspiration to all!

Introducing Beaumont’s New Natural Birth Workshop

Dad holding mom's hands over birthing ball

Cropped image. Sonya Green, CC License.

Beaumont’s Community Health Education Department is happy to announce a new class: Natural Birth Workshop.

This class was developed in response to feedback from expectant families who expressed an increased interest in birthing in a more natural manner, with little or no medical intervention, while maintaining the comfort and safety of a hospital setting.

The goal of Beaumont’s Natural Birth Workshop is to provide mom and her support person with the knowledge and skills needed for a natural birth experience. The workshop will increase mom’s confidence and assist her in developing a personal plan for her baby’s birth.

This is a “hands-on” class where practice will include positioning, breathing for labor and birth, and learning a variety of comfort measures, such as ways to handle labor challenges. The expectant mom’s labor partner will learn how he/she can support mom and the natural birth process. The goal is to help mom work with her body to increase comfort, enhance the birth process, and decrease or eliminate the need for pain medications.

During the workshop, moms will receive information on natural birth, post-partum care/newborn baby care and breastfeeding information. Expectant parents will also receive a natural birth book and a web-based resource for further learning and review.

The workshop is taught by a registered nurse/ childbirth educator. Mom and her support person should attend this Natural Birth Workshop together and plan to complete it about 4–6 weeks before baby’s due date.

Workshops are scheduled in two formats: One full Saturday session or three weeknight sessions on consecutive weeks. The class fee for mom and support person is $120 and includes all materials.

A follow-up session of the workshop is held 4–8 weeks after baby is born. The new family, including baby, is invited to attend a Beyond Birth class where postpartum adjustment, time and priorities, infant massage, and parenting myths and realities will be discussed. The fee for this class is included in the cost of the Natural Birth Workshop.

For dates, times, locations and registration, visit us online or call (800) 633-7377.

Please contact Mary Anne Kenerson, RN, mkenerson@beaumont.edu, (248) 273-6323 with any questions about this class.

We hope to see you in one of our Natural Birth Workshops very soon!

– Mary Anne Kenerson, RN, Coordinator, Community Health Education, Beaumont Health System


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