5 Important Numbers to Plug in Your Teen’s Phone Today

A teenage couple using cell phones

Many teens have cell phones, and if not a phone, some other portal to the Internet. These are five numbers that should be made available to every teen simply by adding them to the contact list. Some of these topics are extremely heavy, so it’s ideal to discuss what to do in conjunction with dialing or sharing these numbers.

1. Poison Control: (800) 222-1222

This is a great number to have for teens who babysit or even just watch younger siblings. However, poison control isn’t just for babies. Some topics that may impact teens include drug or alcohol use, improper use of over-the-counter or prescription medication, teen trends including the “cinnamon challenge”, side effects from energy drinks, carbon monoxide poisoning, eye or skin exposure to a chemical, insect or animal bites, poison ivy, mixing cleaners and food poisoning.

Parent message: Let your kids know that it’s OK to talk to you if they’re concerned about a friend’s, or their own, drinking or drug use. Also discuss when calling Poison Control is appropriate, and when to dial 911 instead.

2. NoBLE/Common Ground Bullying Hotline: (855) UR-NOBLE (855-876-6253)

Beaumont Health’s NoBLE (No Bullying Live Empowered) program has a 24/7 bullying hotline operated by Common Ground, a non-profit crisis intervention agency. In addition to the hotline, NoBLE has additional resources available to help support kids affected by bullying.

Parent message: Talk to your kids about bullying, including why it’s important to not be a bully or a bully bystander. Let them know to talk to you if they are being bullied, or if they witness bullying of one of their peers.

3. Love is Respect, a project of the National Domestic Violence Hotline: (866) 331-9474

The statistics for teen dating violence is shocking. According to loveisrespect.org, “One in three adolescents in the U.S. is a victim of physical, sexual, emotional or verbal abuse from a dating partner, a figure that far exceeds rates of other types of youth violence”. Teens often have little experience in relationships and aren’t always able to identify when behavior is considered “abuse”.

Parent message: Make sure to let your children know that they can talk with you about personal things and that you won’t overreact. If they believe you can handle problems together, they may feel more inclined to talk to you about behavior that makes them uncomfortable. Visit the Love is Respect site and review the warning signs of abuse together so they will know if things are getting dangerous.

4. National Eating Disorder Association: (800) 931-2237

Having access to the Internet can lead those suffering with eating disorders to the wrong kind of “support” by finding those who enable this disease.

If you type certain eating disorder “code words” into the Instagram search features, a warning pops up advising of possible graphic content. It gives the option to click “learn more” and you’ll be directed to an Instagram page with information about eating disorders and links where to get help.

If you do the same search on Pinterest, a banner message appears with the message: “Eating disorders are not lifestyle choices; they are mental disorders that if left untreated can cause serious health problems or could even be life-threatening. For treatment referrals, information, and support, you can always contact the National Eating Disorders Association Helpline at 1-800-931-2237 or
www.nationaleatingdisorders.org”.

The National Institute of Heath reports that eating disorders frequently begin in the teen years and that girls are at a 2½ times greater risk.

Parent message: Make healthy body image a family priority. Be aware of the signs of each different eating disorder listed here. Two newer eating disorders include Diabulemia, a disorder specific to those with Type 1 Diabetes, and Orthorexia Nervosa, which occurs when healthy eating becomes an obsession.

5. The National Suicide Prevention Hotline: (800) 273-8255

Chances are your teen has heard about, or known someone who has committed suicide. According to the Centers for Disease Control, suicide is the third-leading cause of death for people age 10–24. Unfortunately, there’s a huge stigma attached to suicide, and it isn’t openly discussed. Often family and friends didn’t realize their loved one was suffering.

Parent message: Talk to your teen about suicide. It’s an extremely uncomfortable topic to discuss, but it’s very important to establish an open dialogue. Discuss the warning signs. Let them know that they can talk to you about anything, including thoughts of hurting themselves or concern for friends exhibiting these behaviors. Instruct your teen that it’s imperative to tell you right away if anyone they know talks about committing suicide, even if your child thinks they’re joking or exaggerating.

– Erica Surman, RN, BSN, Pediatric Trauma Program Manager, Beaumont Health System

100,000 Families: A Milestone to Celebrate!

Woman with interacting with 2 babies

Shout it from the mountain tops! Put on your party hats! Break out in dance! Rejoice in song! This week, the Parenting Program celebrates providing support and education to over 100,000 families! Woo! Woo!

A Bit of History

The Beaumont Parenting Program began 34 years ago as a research project with Michigan State University. With a focus on community outreach and primary prevention, this free program was designed to provide a safe environment where new parents could share, learn and grow together. Central to the project: matching experienced, trained parent volunteers with new parents to help educate and mentor them.

Ever-Growing, Ever-Changing

Since its inception in 1980, Beaumont’s Parenting Program continues to grow in scope and size. What began as a small “neighborhood” project, with only a handful of volunteers, has grown into a program with over 300 dedicated volunteers who provide support and education to more than 5,000 families annually. As market trends shift and family’s needs change, our program continues to evolve finding new and innovative ways to meet the needs of the community. Some recent highlights include:

  • In 2008 we became the first hospital in southeast Michigan, among only a handful of hospitals in the nation, to develop a comprehensive program focused on postpartum adjustments and depression.
  • In 2009 the Parenting Program developed Beaumont’s first consumer Facebook fan page that now has a following of close to 2,000 fans.
  • In 2010 we launched Beaumont’s first consumer blog for new parents. In the first two months, we had over 4,000 viewers and now we have a fan base that reaches out to over 91 countries.
  • In 2012 we successfully launched an “in-room” car seat safety education program.

Award Winning and Unique to Beaumont Health

We are especially proud that for almost 35 years, we have what no other hospital in the state of Michigan has: an award-winning Parenting Program. When comparing our local and national hospital systems, there is no other hospital-based program that offers such in-depth and comprehensive services. Presented with two national awards in the past five years, the Parenting Program continues to be commended for inspiring community impact, collaboration, innovation and best practices. Recognized as a “Program of Excellence” and considered a “Jewel in the Community,” the Parenting Program is a shining example of service at its best. It embodies the true spirit of giving and generosity. It embodies the true mission of Beaumont Health.

Program Impact

When you stop to think about the sheer number and measurement of “100,000” families, it is indeed an astounding sum and achievement. But when you think about the true impact, the uniqueness is in the stories from the touch of one person to a plenitude of families. The stories come in many shapes and many forms and the paths lead to incredible accounts of success, dedication, compassion, friendships, heroic actions, and even life-saving measures.

Volunteers are the Foundation of Our Success

Beaumont Parenting Program Advisory Board

At the heart of the Parenting Program is a group of compassionate and dedicated volunteers who give selflessly of their time and passion to help provide support to new parents. A special shout out to all of our volunteers past and present: It is through your efforts that we have been able to support and educate over 100,000 Beaumont families. Thank you for making every effort to ensure that our focus and commitment remains on the needs of our children and their families, that our focus remains on building a strong and healthy community. To our amazing volunteers, keep your passion for new parents filled with the genuine belief that you are making a difference in the world each and every day.

A very special thanks goes out to our amazing staff, generous donors, and our community partners for your dedication and commitment to serving the diverse needs of our community.

We are filled with great pride and exuberance as we announce this major achievement. Please “like” this post if you are proud and exuberant too!

This post is dedicated to Beth Frydlewicz, our fearless leader of the Parenting Program for more than 25 years. You are an inspiration to all!

Introducing Beaumont’s New Natural Birth Workshop

Dad holding mom's hands over birthing ball

Cropped image. Sonya Green, CC License.

Beaumont’s Community Health Education Department is happy to announce a new class: Natural Birth Workshop.

This class was developed in response to feedback from expectant families who expressed an increased interest in birthing in a more natural manner, with little or no medical intervention, while maintaining the comfort and safety of a hospital setting.

The goal of Beaumont’s Natural Birth Workshop is to provide mom and her support person with the knowledge and skills needed for a natural birth experience. The workshop will increase mom’s confidence and assist her in developing a personal plan for her baby’s birth.

This is a “hands-on” class where practice will include positioning, breathing for labor and birth, and learning a variety of comfort measures, such as ways to handle labor challenges. The expectant mom’s labor partner will learn how he/she can support mom and the natural birth process. The goal is to help mom work with her body to increase comfort, enhance the birth process, and decrease or eliminate the need for pain medications.

During the workshop, moms will receive information on natural birth, post-partum care/newborn baby care and breastfeeding information. Expectant parents will also receive a natural birth book and a web-based resource for further learning and review.

The workshop is taught by a registered nurse/ childbirth educator. Mom and her support person should attend this Natural Birth Workshop together and plan to complete it about 4–6 weeks before baby’s due date.

Workshops are scheduled in two formats: One full Saturday session or three weeknight sessions on consecutive weeks. The class fee for mom and support person is $120 and includes all materials.

A follow-up session of the workshop is held 4–8 weeks after baby is born. The new family, including baby, is invited to attend a Beyond Birth class where postpartum adjustment, time and priorities, infant massage, and parenting myths and realities will be discussed. The fee for this class is included in the cost of the Natural Birth Workshop.

For dates, times, locations and registration, visit us online or call (800) 633-7377.

Please contact Mary Anne Kenerson, RN, mkenerson@beaumont.edu, (248) 273-6323 with any questions about this class.

We hope to see you in one of our Natural Birth Workshops very soon!

– Mary Anne Kenerson, RN, Coordinator, Community Health Education, Beaumont Health System

Meet the Beaumont Center for Children’s Rehabilitation

Girl on floor puzzle holding a letter.

Floor puzzles offer great visual, sensory and motor skill development.

Therapy services at the Beaumont Center for Children’s Rehabilitation have become very diverse. Not only has our program grown geographically (we now have clinics in Royal Oak, West Bloomfield and Grosse Pointe), but we’ve broadened our specialty services and our scope of care.

Overview
We provide therapy for children with long-term rehabilitation needs, but we’re focused on shorter bursts of therapy–capturing a child’s key developmental times, providing therapy, and then taking a break until they are ready to resume again. Often children are transitioned into other programs either within our clinic or within the community, which provides for intensive and successful therapy and better long-term results. We also provide therapy for children with more short-term needs where a brief course of treatment is provided and they rarely need to come back.

Therapist holding a child on foam slide.

In our sensory rooms, children are able to participate in therapy on swings, padded slides, large cloud pillows, and ball pits.

Services Offered
Our patients come to us with neurological, orthopedic, sensory and developmental needs. We’re trained to work with a large range of diagnoses and ages (birth–18). In addition to offering groups for children with special needs, we also offer groups for children without a diagnosis. For example, we offer very successful handwriting groups for children who are struggling with all aspects of handwriting and letter formation.

We also offer group programs which help to enhance therapy goals, and/or offer therapeutic activities for children who may not need intensive therapy. We offer adapted dance, martial arts, sports groups; as well as sensory integration, feeding, social, peer support and vision groups.

Our programs fall under four main therapy areas:

  • Occupational: Focus on fine motor, arm strength and movement, dressing, eating, vision, sensory and feeding (picky eaters, babies with latching or swallowing difficulties).
  • Physical: Focus on gross motor, leg strength and movement, walking, head and neck movement and position
  • Speech Therapy: Language skills (expressive, receptive, articulation)
  • Social Work: Family and patient coping skills, emotional support, assist with insurance and community assistance.
Child doing therapy using a universal exercise unit.

Every clinic has a universal exercise unit that helps children isolate muscles for strengthening and they can stand inside and experience standing and jumping with the help of bungee cords.

Getting Help
If you have a concern about your child’s development or recovery from an injury, please talk to his/her physician about a referral to therapy. While children all develop or recover from an injury at a different pace, even siblings, don’t disregard concerns you have. A parent’s instinct is important and your pediatrician can help you determine the best plan. We can evaluate and offer suggestions for ongoing treatment or a program for home. For more information, visit us online.

Have a wonderful summer; this is a great time to develop motor, sensory and language skills by just getting outside and playing with your children.

– Debbie Adsit, OTRL, is the Supervisor, Pediatric Rehabilitation at the  Beaumont Center for Children’s Rehabilitation. She can be reached at (248) 655-5687.