Posts Tagged 'support'

Helping your child recover from a sports injury

soccer injury

Kids will be kids. That’s what they say, right? Unfortunately with kids playing sports at the level they do today, we have to deal with cuts, scrapes and bruises, but now also orthopedic sports injuries. Some of these require emergency room (ER) visits and doctor follow ups, but many of them can be healed at home with proper immediate care and a good recovery plan.

In this article, we talk about home recovery from mild sports injuries. It’s important to note that anytime there is concern about a broken bone, uncontrolled bleeding, head injury, or infection (such as tetanus), you should see a doctor right away, often at your local ER or urgent care center.

The first step is calming the pain and inflammation after injury. When the body is injured, swelling occurs from the inflammatory process the body elicits to prevent further damage to tissues; when swelling is high, pain usually follows quickly. We use the R.I.C.E. protocol to reduce and control this process, which stands for rest, ice, compression and elevation. Usually the rest, ice and elevation all happen together—for example stopping soccer practice to place ice on your ankle while elevating it above your heart. The elevation above the heart level, which usually requires lying down, allows gravity to help move the swelling back toward the heart, doubling the effect.

Compression (e.g., wrapping an ACE bandage around the ankle) occurs after the icing and prevents more swelling from occurring. Icing should be done no more than 10–15 minutes at a time and always with a barrier between ice and skin. Fun fact: Ice can burn the skin as easily as heat! Anti-inflammatory medication is also an option to reduce inflammation, but always at the recommendation of a physician to ensure the proper dosing and safety for your child.

After the swelling and pain are reduced, your child may be itching to return to his or her sport, but it’s important to have a slow return back to full performance to allow for greatest potential of no reoccurrence or reinjury. This may be participating in only practice with the ability to take a break if pain returns, staying away completely and doing exercises at home, and/or coming to physical therapy in addition to return to sport. Teachers and coaches must be made aware of the injury and should be accommodating to your child during recovery. If your child is too young to understand his limits or her coach is pressuring without accommodating, then you, as a parent, must take charge of your child’s recovery and keep away from the sport for extra time. When our muscles are working at only 50 or 60 percent, they are more susceptible to additional injuries from overworking or incorrect form. Taking extra time away and addressing the targeted area allows muscles to recover fully before being asked to perform at a high level.

So how do I know what to do for my child? For a complex injury or if you really are clueless, that is what your local physical therapist is for! Depending on the severity of the injury, your child may need to see a specialized sports medicine doctor, but we can evaluate your child and create a specific exercise program in just a few sessions. Sometimes three or four sessions to watch the healing and learn some exercises is all it takes. However if we identify fundamental issues that may have contributed to the injury, therapy may continue for a while. Remember, often kids listen better to instruction coming from someone other than mom or dad.

A good start on a minor injury is to exercise that body part starting with non-weight-bearing (called open-chain in rehab world) and progressing to weight-bearing (called closed-chain). For hand and upper extremity injuries, children should start with no weight and slowly add weight or resistance. Please keep in mind that pre-pubescent children should never perform heavy or repeated weight lifting, due to the integrity of growth plates.

So now that your child is ready to return to her activity, remember slow and steady wins the race! The hardest thing to do is hold back, but often times injuries feel fine with day-to-day work and we aren’t truly sure of where our healing is until it is tested. Not to mention, after a break from working out, everything is a little rusty and just like we need to work back up slowly to full strength, so do our children.

For any other questions or if you feel your child needs a skilled evaluation for his injury, give us a call at any of our Center for Children’s Rehabilitation locations in Grosse Pointe, Royal Oak, Macomb, and West Bloomfield.

– Lauren Sofen, PT, DPT, PCS, Physical Therapist, Beaumont Health Center/Neighborhood Club

Fun support for speech and language challenges

Pediatric speech therapy

Parents often wonder if they’re doing everything they can to help their children succeed. That’s part of the reason there are so many kid-centered programs available in our community. Many of those groups and classes focus on supporting children’s social and academic growth, as well as engaging them in fun activities.

But what if you want those same things for the children in your life who have speech and language delays? Perhaps you’ve spoken with your pediatrician, initiated an evaluation and treatment, and are doing the home activities provided by your clinician. How can parents provide more, while keeping things appropriate for children with varied abilities and challenges?

Beaumont Health offers various group programs for children with communication difficulties through The Center for Childhood Speech and Language Disorders. These groups support and enhance the individual treatment in which children participate. Most of our group programs run year-round, so there are opportunities to participate throughout the school year and during the summer months as well. In order to provide an optimal experience, children are placed in groups based upon their skills and needs, as well as their ages and schedule availability.

Lil’ Sprouts. The Lil’ Sprouts group program is an educational course designed for parents/caregivers along with their children between the ages of 18 months to 2 ½ years. The goal of this program is to teach parents/caregivers how to increase speech and language within their home environment.

Toddler Group. The Toddler Language Stimulation Program supports expressive language development and speech clarity skills within a peer group. Children between 2 and 3 years old participate in functional, hands-on group activities that promote independent communication skills.

PALS. The PALS group is an intervention program targeting social communication and language development for children with Autism Spectrum Disorders. Play-based activities are used to target early communication skills including joint attention, eye contact, initiation and requesting, play skills, turn-taking, and transitioning.

PEP Group. The Pragmatic Enrichment Program (PEP) is designed to teach children with language impairments to interact comfortably with their peers. The goal is to help the child have more positive social relationships and more success interacting in the classroom setting. Specific areas of social interactive and pragmatic skills are addressed, and coordinated with children’s individual goals.

Literacy Group. The Literacy Program is aimed at preparing children between the ages of 4 and 7 years for early literacy intervention. Sessions focus on phonological awareness skills including sound-letter correspondence, sound blending, and other skills needed for reading.

There are four metro Detroit locations available to serve the community, including Royal Oak, Grosse Pointe, West Bloomfield, and Macomb Township.

Talk to your pediatrician if you have concerns about your child’s speech and language development. An evaluation by a speech-language pathologist can determine if your child could benefit from individual or group treatment options.

– Emily Rogers, M.A., CCC-SLP, Speech and Language Pathologist, Children’s Speech and Language Pathology Department, Beaumont Health

Empty arms: The complicated grief of perinatal loss and how Beaumont can help

 Lots of lit tealight candles

Today, October 15, is National Pregnancy and Infant Loss Remembrance Day.

For many parents, the moment they learn they’re expecting, they begin to attach to their baby. They begin planning. Dreaming. Thinking about all they want and hope for their yet-to-be born child.

The greatest heartbreak is when there is a pregnancy loss. This loss is often devastating because it’s not only the loss of a child, but the loss of all the hopes and dreams parents had for their child. Intense grieving often follows.

Many parents who’ve suffered the loss of their baby find much comfort and support in Beaumont’s Looking Ahead Bereaved Parents Support Group, a group specifically designed to meet the needs of parents who’ve lost a baby.

How our group can help

Our support group focuses on the very specific loss involved in pregnancy, stillbirth or death of an infant. Our members find the group particularly helpful because they’re with others who’ve experienced a similar loss. Parents can really express the intensity of their loss openly.

Tips for your support system

Often family, friends and co-workers may mean well with their comments and reactions, but sometimes these are hurtful as well. Comments like “Your baby’s an angel in heaven now,” “It’s for the best,” “You’ll get pregnant again soon,” “Why are you still so sad?” are upsetting.

Instead, it’s best for family members and friends to just listen and be non-judgmental. The best response is often as simple as “I’m so sorry for your loss.”

It’s also helpful to recall and remember the baby who died. Refer to the baby by name. One of the greatest concerns that grieving parents have is that their child will be forgotten. Grieving parents want and need acknowledgment that their baby existed. That they are parents and their baby mattered and is remembered.

Join us

Our Looking Ahead Bereaved Parents Support Group is a drop-in group, so pre-registration isn’t necessary. Parents can come to just one group, or attend monthly. The group is facilitated by Judy Kotzen, LMSW, a medical social worker at Beaumont Health.

  • When: The second Tuesday of every month from 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.
  • Where: Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak in the Administration Building West (AB-West) at 3601 W 13 Mile Rd, Royal Oak, Michigan 48073. Enter in the Administration Building’s main entrance, then follow the signs to the private dining room on the first floor.
  • Parking: Park in the South Deck (green)

For additional information

Please contact Judy Kotzen at (248) 898-7219.

Tackling Test Anxiety

Photo of a hand completing a multiple choice test

Cropped image. Alberto G, Flickr. CC License.

Spring is here, along with the rounds of college entrance and advanced placement exams. For school-age children, the M-STEP testing is coming up soon. Most of us hope our children will do well, but for some families there is an extra layer of worry: their children suffer from “test anxiety”.

“I studied and I knew the material. But as soon as I started looking at the questions, I felt nervous and sweaty. My mind went blank. I couldn’t remember much of what I’d learned. I just started guessing. I did horribly on the exam and now I’m angry and sad.”

What exactly is test anxiety? The Anxiety and Depression Association of America (ADAA) describes test anxiety as a type of performance anxiety.

There are several reasons for test anxiety.

  • Students who had previous negative experiences with test-taking may develop worry in anticipation of the test.
  • Another common reason is poor preparation. Students who struggle to get organized and/or manage their time wisely will be challenged to prepare adequately.
  • Fear of failure also contributes – thinking that our self-worth is wrapped up in that grade causes extra tension and stress. This is a double-bind, because all that worry and fear inhibit the ability to set up a structured plan and prepare effectively.

Luckily there are a variety of tips and tricks for managing test anxiety, including these from the ADAA:

  • Be prepared. Be aware of when tests are happening and study in smaller increments over time rather than pulling all-nighters or “cramming”.
  • Be a good test-taker. Read all the directions carefully. Complete questions you know first, and then go back to harder ones. Outline essay answers.
  • Stay positive. Your self-worth is not dependent on a test grade. Reward yourself for staying on track with study goals. Some anxiety is normal and natural, expect it and let it be there. Let anxious thoughts come and go, but stay focused on the task of studying or taking the test.
  • Stay focused. Don’t worry about what everyone else is doing; focus on the test in front of you. Avoid talking to others about the material before the exam.
  • Use relaxation techniques. Taking slow, deep breaths and consciously relaxing your muscles one at a time can help energize you and sharpen your focus.
  • Stay healthy. Get enough sleep, exercise, and eat healthy foods. Exhaustion and fatigue do not good test-takers make.
  • Get help. If needed, your school counselor or college counseling center can help with needed resources. Sometimes special accommodations are needed, but most of the time, test anxiety can be managed effectively by following these guidelines.

– Lori Warner, Ph.D., LP, BCBA-D, Director, HOPE Center at Beaumont Children’s Hospital

A Love Letter to the Beaumont Parenting Program

Mom holding a NICU newborn

Sara Kuhn with daughter, Grace

I was admitted to the antepartum unit at Beaumont, Royal Oak in mid-December 2013 where I stayed (aside from a brief few days at home in January) until I gave birth to my daughter via cesarean section on Feb. 12, 2014. She was 10 1/2 weeks premature, weighed 3 pounds 7 oz., and spent 41 days in the NICU.

Baby in isolette

Grace in her isolette.

My first experience with the Parenting Program was two days after Grace was born. It was Valentine’s Day and I made the slow trek from the 6th floor down to the 5 th to visit my baby. I was physically and emotionally exhausted from being in the hospital for so long and feeling rather sad. Friends and family are unsure how to react when the fate of your newborn is unknown, so the normal, hearty congratulations and excitement aren’t as forthcoming. When I arrived to her room, it was decorated! There were construction paper hearts and decorations with her name on it. This may seem like such a small thing to care about so much, but it was very uplifting. It felt wonderful to know that other people were acknowledging that my baby was worth celebrating. Over the course of our stay, the regularly delivered small and thoughtful gifts were instrumental in keeping my spirits up.

My next experience consisted of meeting and getting to know Michelle Enerson, NICU Coordinator with the Parenting Program. She reached out to me shortly after Grace arrived in the NICU and I was very impressed with her warm, friendly demeanor. I was ecstatic to discover that there were classes held right in the NICU for new parents to learn about different topics regarding parenting and child care. I had planned to take classes before giving birth and was very disappointed when I couldn’t. Michelle taught me safe sleep practices, how to bathe my baby, and basic CPR among other things. The best part was that I didn’t have to leave the NICU. I got to take a break from the worry without feeling guilty and felt like I was actively doing something to help. She also put me in touch with Melanie, a volunteer, who quickly became a lifeline for me as someone who went through the NICU experience herself and could relate to how I was feeling. It was a huge help to see a light at the end of the tunnel. We communicated through phone calls, email and text, which was perfect. We are still in contact and recently met in person for the first time. There was a lot of hugging. It was a wonderful experience.

I also joined an evening parenting group with my husband. We were put in a group with babies around Grace’s adjusted age so she was at the same developmental stages as the others. My husband especially benefited from our group as he didn’t have any other Dad friends and was feeling rather isolated. It’s great have so many other parents to bounce ideas off of or to commiserate with on the peculiarities of raising children! Our leaders, Emily Swan Detrisac and her husband, Bill, were fantastic — very approachable and kind. We really enjoyed the topics and they boosted our confidence in many of our parental decisions. Our group made plans to get together after our last topic date, too.

Baby girl standing in pack-n-play

Happy Grace!

I’m so grateful for the wonderful experiences that I had with the Parenting Program. Being a new parent can be challenging, frightening and isolating. Through the Parenting Program I gained knowledge, confidence and lasting friendships. I’m looking forward to becoming a volunteer and giving back to new parents.

Thank you!

– Sara Kuhn is a Parenting Program participant and new volunteer.

5 Important Numbers to Plug in Your Teen’s Phone Today

A teenage couple using cell phones

Many teens have cell phones, and if not a phone, some other portal to the Internet. These are five numbers that should be made available to every teen simply by adding them to the contact list. Some of these topics are extremely heavy, so it’s ideal to discuss what to do in conjunction with dialing or sharing these numbers.

1. Poison Control: (800) 222-1222

This is a great number to have for teens who babysit or even just watch younger siblings. However, poison control isn’t just for babies. Some topics that may impact teens include drug or alcohol use, improper use of over-the-counter or prescription medication, teen trends including the “cinnamon challenge”, side effects from energy drinks, carbon monoxide poisoning, eye or skin exposure to a chemical, insect or animal bites, poison ivy, mixing cleaners and food poisoning.

Parent message: Let your kids know that it’s OK to talk to you if they’re concerned about a friend’s, or their own, drinking or drug use. Also discuss when calling Poison Control is appropriate, and when to dial 911 instead.

2. NoBLE/Common Ground Bullying Hotline: (855) UR-NOBLE (855-876-6253)

Beaumont Health’s NoBLE (No Bullying Live Empowered) program has a 24/7 bullying hotline operated by Common Ground, a non-profit crisis intervention agency. In addition to the hotline, NoBLE has additional resources available to help support kids affected by bullying.

Parent message: Talk to your kids about bullying, including why it’s important to not be a bully or a bully bystander. Let them know to talk to you if they are being bullied, or if they witness bullying of one of their peers.

3. Love is Respect, a project of the National Domestic Violence Hotline: (866) 331-9474

The statistics for teen dating violence is shocking. According to loveisrespect.org, “One in three adolescents in the U.S. is a victim of physical, sexual, emotional or verbal abuse from a dating partner, a figure that far exceeds rates of other types of youth violence”. Teens often have little experience in relationships and aren’t always able to identify when behavior is considered “abuse”.

Parent message: Make sure to let your children know that they can talk with you about personal things and that you won’t overreact. If they believe you can handle problems together, they may feel more inclined to talk to you about behavior that makes them uncomfortable. Visit the Love is Respect site and review the warning signs of abuse together so they will know if things are getting dangerous.

4. National Eating Disorder Association: (800) 931-2237

Having access to the Internet can lead those suffering with eating disorders to the wrong kind of “support” by finding those who enable this disease.

If you type certain eating disorder “code words” into the Instagram search features, a warning pops up advising of possible graphic content. It gives the option to click “learn more” and you’ll be directed to an Instagram page with information about eating disorders and links where to get help.

If you do the same search on Pinterest, a banner message appears with the message: “Eating disorders are not lifestyle choices; they are mental disorders that if left untreated can cause serious health problems or could even be life-threatening. For treatment referrals, information, and support, you can always contact the National Eating Disorders Association Helpline at 1-800-931-2237 or
www.nationaleatingdisorders.org”.

The National Institute of Heath reports that eating disorders frequently begin in the teen years and that girls are at a 2½ times greater risk.

Parent message: Make healthy body image a family priority. Be aware of the signs of each different eating disorder listed here. Two newer eating disorders include Diabulemia, a disorder specific to those with Type 1 Diabetes, and Orthorexia Nervosa, which occurs when healthy eating becomes an obsession.

5. The National Suicide Prevention Hotline: (800) 273-8255

Chances are your teen has heard about, or known someone who has committed suicide. According to the Centers for Disease Control, suicide is the third-leading cause of death for people age 10–24. Unfortunately, there’s a huge stigma attached to suicide, and it isn’t openly discussed. Often family and friends didn’t realize their loved one was suffering.

Parent message: Talk to your teen about suicide. It’s an extremely uncomfortable topic to discuss, but it’s very important to establish an open dialogue. Discuss the warning signs. Let them know that they can talk to you about anything, including thoughts of hurting themselves or concern for friends exhibiting these behaviors. Instruct your teen that it’s imperative to tell you right away if anyone they know talks about committing suicide, even if your child thinks they’re joking or exaggerating.

– Erica Surman, RN, BSN, Pediatric Trauma Program Manager, Beaumont Health System

Beaumont Parenting Program Contest: Grand Prize Winner

Mom, dad and daughter standing in park

When I found out I was pregnant, I was so excited but also very nervous. My pregnancy was full of constant anxiety and some depression, but I stupidly thought that all of that would just melt away when my daughter was born. Boy was I wrong!

I remember the first night in the hospital: Sitting on the edge of the bed looking over at my newborn daughter all bundled up and my snoring husband enjoying his slumber, I had an intense feeling of panic and doom. I would fall asleep hard, but then wake up basically mid panic attack and then be afraid to fall back asleep.

I was very blessed to have a very supportive husband and also extended family that stayed with us to help with nighttime feedings, but I started feeling guilty because I wasn’t caring for my baby all by myself. It was a terrible cycle and I was continuing to get worse. I started to hear voices and I was paranoid that I would hurt my baby or someone else. I had to spend five days in a mental health facility away from my daughter and family to get myself back. It was the hardest time ever, but I survived it!

Then I was introduced to the Beaumont Parenting Program and an angel by the name of Kelly Ryan. I remember my first postpartum adjustment support group meeting. I walked in and was greeted by her welcoming smile. I was a mess but she was so patient with me. I remember telling my story and bawling to her. Her support and her listening ear helped immensely. She then called the psychiatrist office that the program worked with and got me in for an appointment the very next day! I was also given a contact number to someone who had gone through similar issues. Kelly was doing anything and everything she could to help and continued to tell me that I would make it through this.

I am forever grateful that the Beaumont Parenting Program support group was there to help me make it through my postpartum depression/psychosis. I have since made it my duty to be there for any friend, family member or even stranger who goes through any postpartum issues. I feel that I made it through my issues to pay it forward and help anyone else I can. Together we will make it through this!

– Sarah Hutton


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